Natural Lands’ Bryn Coed Preserve

In 2017, Natural Lands acquired a 1,505-acre mosaic of forest and farmland known as Bryn Coed—which means “wooded hill” in Welsh. In doing so, we saved one of the largest remaining unprotected swaths of land in the greater Philadelphia region from becoming a housing development.

The 520-acre preserve includes a Pennsylvania Champion white oak, the headwaters of the Pickering Creek, and several Bald Eagle nesting spots. Miles of hiking trails meander past 19th century stone farmhouses, historical ruins, and other remnants of the land’s agricultural past.

Please note: a portion of the trails traverse private property. Please respect the owners’ privacy and stay on the trails.

Features:

1869 Flint Rd
Chester Springs, Pennsylvania 19425

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This project is a part of “From the Source: Stories of the Delaware River” and is produced with support from the National Geographic Society, the Lenfest Institute for Journalism, and the William Penn Foundation. Editorial content is created independent of the project’s donors.